Monday -Saturday 9am-5pm

Closed Sundays

Monday-Friday 9am-6pm
Saturday 9am-5pm
Sunday 10am-5pm

Mon-Thurs 9am-5pm
Friday 9am-4pm

Monday -Saturday 9am-5pm

Closed Sundays

Monday-Friday 9am-6pm
Saturday 9am-5pm
Sunday 10am-5pm

Mon-Thurs 9am-5pm
Friday 9am-4pm

Plant Care and Warranty

Tree & Shrub Guarantee

Warranty

When planted by Black Diamond , trees and shrubs are warranted for replacement at 100% of the actual purchase price for ONE YEAR. When planted by the customer, trees and shrubs are warranted for replacement at 100% of the actual purchase price for the FIRST SIX MONTHS and 50% for the SECOND SIX MONTHS.

Warranty Conditions

Sale items are warranted for replacement at the sale price. Save your sales receipt in case replacement is necessary. If you have concerns about your plant, contact the store for an evaluation of the conditions and we will help you with a plan of care or replacement. Trees and shrubs will be replaced just one time. Trees and shrubs that have been damaged by circumstances beyond our control will not be replaced. Warranty does not apply if your account is not current. Warranty does not apply to commercial customers. No cash refunds.

Plant Care

Watering is a simple yet essential part of caring for trees and shrubs. Keep your trees and shrubs adequately watered by following the guidelines listed below.

When and how to water your trees

Check the soil. There is no way to look at the soil from above and tell how much moisture is in it. Dry soils can cause the death of small roots and reduce a tree’s capacity to absorb water, even after the soil is re-moistened. Drought stress can increase a tree’s susceptibility to certain diseases and insects. To check the soil’s moisture, use either a hand trowel, a soil probe, or place your finger into the soil Very dry soil will resist penetration and indicate the need for watering.

 

Use watering bags for trees

When filled with water and placed by or around a tree trunk, these vessels will allow water to drip directly into the soil around the roots. The bags let you deliver a set amount of water each time. They are a good way to keep your younger tree well watered.

Water the roots.

There is no reason to water the leaves of a plant. Water the soil, where the roots are. The Arboretum recommends watering within the drip line of a tree, from the trunk out to the end of the branches, to reach the roots most effectively. The water-absorbing roots are within the top two feet of soil; you want to keep these roots moist but not wet. Avoid frequent, light watering. Instead, water deeply at wider intervals such as once a week. Let a garden hose run slowly at the drip line of the tree, moving it around occasionally. At medium pressure it will take about five minutes to produce 10 gallons of water.

If using a sprinkler system, place a straight-sided container under the sprinkler and water until it has filled one to two inches. If you deliver the equivalent of one to two inches of rain, the water will percolate into the soil about six inches, reaching the fine, water-absorbing roots.

Newly planted trees

Proper watering is the single most important maintenance factor in the care of transplanted trees. Too much or too little water can result in tree injury. More trees are killed by too much water than by too little.

Check new plants and trees often. Newly-planted trees, shrubs, and perennials are still establishing their root systems. Check the soil around their roots often to see if it has dried out. The tree draws most of its moisture from the root ball. The root ball can dry out in only a day or two, even while surrounding soil remains moist.

Plants should receive up to one inch of water weekly. Water both the root ball (right around the trunk), and the surrounding area. Water deeply and then let the water soak in to encourage new roots to grow deeper into the soil.